This version (2016/02/26 23:24) was approved by larshilse.The Previously approved version (2016/02/26 21:53) is available.Diff

Introduction

The Internet has been called humanity’s most important invention. Therefore, there must be humanity’s most important document governing it.

The Global Internet Magna Carta Project deals with everything from profane questions like “what happens with your digital content in the case of death” up to fundamentals of mankind, for instance that all nations and private entities adhere to the human right for privacy.

Further rights of Internet users, as well as global quality standards to secure digital infrastructure are also paramount.

Why a regional/national Internet Magna Carta will not work

The Global Internet Magna Carta is something so comprehensive, that it took two years to research and create. And it is work in progress.

The internet’s influence on society has become substantial - this document had to be translated to over 20 languages - so that every human being on earth has equal access to it.

We need a GLOBAL Internet Magna Carta

Attempts have been made all across the globe to create documents to preserve the rights of internet users.

All of them were local.

The Internet knows no borders or regional boundaries, which is why all previous attempts had an unsatisfactory outcome.

The Global Internet Magna Carta aims to unify and organise human rights on the internet for all mankind.

Goals of the Global Internet Magna Carta Project

The set goal of the Global Internet Magna Carta Project is to assist nation states and state actors, as well as private entities to keep the Internet fair for all mankind to use.

With the guidelines created therein, we will attempt to make the Internet a better place. A place for humanity to become more productive and use the Internet more efficiently to drive innovation and to achieve equality among the people of earth.

How is the Global Internet Magna Carta structured?

The Global Internet Magna Carta is structured into three main elements:

  • Basic Human Rights
  • Reducing Internet Crime
  • Intellectual Property